Supported by NEWHAVEN HERITAGE CENTRE which is recognised as a Scottish registered charity No. SC044837

NEWHAVEN — A  UNIQUE FISHING VILLAGE ON THE COAST OF THE FORTH, PROUD OF ITS TRADITIONS, CULTURE AND HISTORY

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If you have contributions to make to the knowledge base and photographic archives on any of the topics on this page, they would be most welcome.


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Newhaven’s Changing Face


by Tommy Titterton

(for his mother, Margaret (Meg) Wilson, a proud Newhavener)



The harbour light is still on

but the fishing boats have gone

The fish that filled grandfather’s nets

have been replaced by empty regrets


The solid stone church is still there

but its members  moved elsewhere

The spire standing so tall

is now a climbing wall


The local park once bathed in colour

looks neglected just like many other

a sea view from the top is worth the climb

but towering flats replace it in time


The shore places where we played

are filled-in and foundations laid

The roots that made us proud

are removed in the dusty cloud


Change takes place like it or not

but the old fishing days will not be forgot

We may move away but are not long gone

glad that the harbour light is still on



Narrative:


I wrote this little poem after one of my many visits to the Harbour, usually in summer. Out toward the lighthouse I stand leaning against a railing recalling my childhood in Newhaven.  I always look back toward the shore and remind myself how much my mother’s family were part of the fishing community.  Indeed I am always reminded of my Great Grandmother’s “wee hoose” below the clock on Pier Place; this is where my mother and her twin sister would visit every Sunday and “do their duty”. Before my time believe it or not!


Then there is the Church where I attended Sunday School, the Scouts and the Youth Club.  Friday night you came out of the Scouts, turned left and went to the chip shop, sitting-in no less with a plate of chips and a red Kola!


Of course there is always a likelihood that you will look back with rose tinted glasses but change has not been particularly kind to the Village. So it is heartening that a sense of community continues to exist despite these changes.